TELLURIDE FIRST THURSDAY ART WALK
See an Abundance of New Artwork Tonight
by Watch Staff
Jul 07, 2011 | 1712 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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THE BUDDHA – At the Ah Haa School, by Renee Van Devere Swire (Courtesy photo)
An exhibit displaying the influence of the Aegean city of Rhodes on painter David Brankley’s work opens this Thursday, July 7 at the Stronghouse Studios gallery at 283 S. Fir St. There will be an opening reception for the artist from 4-8 p.m.

For years, Brankley toured Europe and the Middle East on a bicycle, stopping to draw whatever landscapes and faces happened to interest him. He found himself repeatedly drawn to the Greek city of Rhodes. Today Brankley spends his summers in Telluride, but he continues to visit the Aegean city. These recent paintings chronicle the influence Telluride has had on the city of Rhodes in Brankley’s paintings, and how both got mixed together in his artistic vision. At this point, it is impossible to separate the way the two places have settled inside him, and he describes his work as “washing down elk steaks with ouzo.”

TELLURIDE ARTS PRESENTS:

FIRST THURSDAY ARTS WALK


The First Thursday Art Walk takes place Thursday, July 7, when venues around town open their doors from 5-8 p.m. to introduce their latest works. New this year: self-guided tours in the form of treasure maps, for use by kids and families from 4-6 p.m. For maps and more information, call 970/728-3930, or go to HYPERLINK "http://www.telluridearts.org" www.telluridearts.org. Here are the venues for July 7:

AH HAA SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS

In the Daniel Tucker gallery: watercolors by author-journalist Rob Schultheis, and textiles by Nancy Craft, whose work reflects the years she spent studying various dying and weaving techniques in Kyoto. From July 5-July 15.

GALLERIE FRAMING

“Stormy Skies,” recent works from Colorado and Oklahoma by landscape photographer Melanie Metz.

LA COCINA DE LUZ

Pastels, ceramics and fractal work by Judy Haas. Haas grew up close to nature outside Aspen, and painted her first pictures of trout as gifts for her parents. Her work has been exhibited at the American Museum of Fly Fishing. Here she exhibits trout pastels, along with several painted ceramic dishes and digital fractals.

LUSTRE, AN ARTISAN GALLERY

Jewelry by natural-diamond specialist Todd Reed. Reed is one of the first to work with raw diamonds. He has said he was inspired to explore uncut stones by magazine and TV advertisements implying bigger, brighter gems were more beautiful and made better gifts, believing instead that a truly perfect diamond is one that is, and should remain, unpolished and uncut, exactly as it is found in nature. A self-taught metal worker, he sets the stones, in mostly-dusky shades ranging from soft yellows to grays and greens, in recycled gold and platinum.

SCHILLING STUDIO GALLERY

Works from Donne Bitner, Elizabeth Frank, and Hunter Hogan. Bitner’s mediums include watercolors, pastels and experimental acrylics. Instead of starting a work with a concrete image in her head, she begins by introducing a number of visual elements to a canvas – shapes, shades and/or symbols – and then responding on the basis of feeling, adding new elements or taking others away. She is less interested in the physical world than the world of emotions, and has said she expresses herself through colors, marks and texture. Elizabeth Frank fashions delicate figurative sculptures from fallen aspen wood or reclaimed wood from urban scrap heaps that she combines with found materials such as antique ceiling tin, skeleton keys or old photographs. Landscape painter Hunter Hogan exhibits work she recently completed at Anderson Reach.

Works by young people, from Jeremy Baron’s photography camp at Telluride Academy.

STRONGHOUSE STUDIOS AND LOCAL ARTIST GALLERY

Painter David Brankley’s “A Tale of Two Cities.” Recent paintings of Rhodes, Greece and Telluride.

TELLURIDE GALLERY OF FINE ART

New jewelry from Barbara Heinrich, and an exhibit of twenty-four new works in oil, from figurative painter Malcolm T. Liepke. A former illustrator, Liepke began painting in the 1980’s, when realistic figurative painting was beginning its resurgence. His figures, mostly female, often seem to recall another era; no surprise, as Liepke remains an avid student of Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec. Yet the faces are usually realistic. “If you look at a Rembrandt, while the clothing is different, people are the same,” he has said. “Looking at someone’s face is what inspires my work.”

AZADI FINE RUGS

The oldest family rug weaving company in the world, Azadi specializes in exquisite rugs from around the globe.

THE TELLURIDE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

Artist Judy McGowan, whose photos “In the Courthouse. Portraits from San Miguel County” is on display at the San Miguel County Courthouse until September 16, will be on hand to discuss her work. Also: “Layin’ Down the Law,” the museum’s summer exhibit, showcases photos, newspapers and true-crime magazines that depict the exploits of local lawmen, outlaws and crimes. Butch Cassidy wasn’t the only bank robber who was good at what he did. Included here: the April 1931 issue of New Detective, which broke the story of how Bank of Telluride president C.D. Waggoner managed to swindle $500,000 out of several New York financial institutions to pay his own bank’sdebts.

THE WILKINSON PUBLIC LIBRARY

This month, the library displays the work of local artists. Photographs of Africa by Scott Upshur, acrylic-on-paper depictions of nature by Corinne Scheman, and I Am, bell-bottom jeans of vintage fabrics arranged in a psychedelic canopy, by Brad Chappel.

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