A Foodie’s Tour of Telluride and Its History
by Gus Jarvis
Aug 03, 2013 | 6548 views | 0 0 comments | 294 294 recommendations | email to a friend | print
GRILLED SEA BASS with lobster, tomato and Olathe sweet corn was served at La Marmotte. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
GRILLED SEA BASS with lobster, tomato and Olathe sweet corn was served at La Marmotte. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
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A PORK RILLETTE TOSTADA served at There… during a recent Telluride Food Tour. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
A PORK RILLETTE TOSTADA served at There… during a recent Telluride Food Tour. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
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KITCHEN-SIDE – Cured meats, king crab, buckeyes, and buffalo mozzarella caprese salad were served at a private kitchen side table at Allred’s. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
KITCHEN-SIDE – Cured meats, king crab, buckeyes, and buffalo mozzarella caprese salad were served at a private kitchen side table at Allred’s. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
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Seven Stops at Culinary Hotspots

TELLURIDE – Telluride has both a rich history and a rich culinary scene and now visitors and locals can experience both at once with Telluride Food Tours.

Launched in February by Brittanny Havard, Telluride Food Tours offers a two-and-a-half hour eat-your-way walking tour of Telluride that includes food and drink tastings at seven of Telluride’s eclectic restaurants. During the tour, guides talk about Telluride’s history, from its earliest days as a mining town to the early days of it’s becoming a world class ski destination. 

“The restaurants have been blowing the tour away,” Havard says of the culinary hotspots that make up the Telluride Food Tours.

On a recent Thursday evening tour, guests were treated to a pork rillette tostada at There…(627 W. Pacific Ave.) along with a shaken gin and grapefruit cocktail. La Marmotte (150 W. San Juan Ave.) served up a small plate of grilled sea bass with lobster, tomato and Olathe sweet corn.

Locally brewed beer and juicy ribs were on the menu at Smugglers Brewpub (225 S. Pine St.).

An array of beautiful dishes including king crab legs and caprese salad made with rich buffalo mozzarella cheese was served on a kitchen-side table at Allred’s (top of the gondola, St. Sophia Station). There was a special spicy elk sausage at the Appaloosa Trading Co. (129 W. Colorado Ave.) and a gigantic diver scallop served on a carrot/ginger puree at Flavor Telluride (122 S. Oak St.) with a refreshing cantaloupe, basil, cucumber, lime, and vodka drink.

Havard says that the tours she offers are not all the same.  There is a rotating slate of participating restaurants that change things up, and the tours follow different routes as well. Other stops may include Arroyo and Telluride Truffle as well.

While food and drink may be the main attraction for some, Havard and her team of guides spice it up with Telluride’s storied history, with support from the Telluride Historical Museum. From the ethnic neighborhoods of Telluride’s mining days to the significance of the Roma Bar and from the country’s first alternating power source to how Telluride got its name, there is plenty of history dished out along the way, some of it unknown even to longtime Telluride locals.  

Havard borrowed the idea of combining food, history and a walking tour after she and her sister, along with a group of family and friends, recently joined a food/history tour of Greenwich Village in lower Manhattan.  

“That was really fun,” Havard says. “When I got back to Telluride, I realized that it was a concept I could bring to Telluride. The tour benefits the town because it's a new activity and it benefits the restaurants.”

Havard, who has a background in marketing, wrote a business plan for the Telluride Food Tours, set up a website, brushed up on her Telluride history, and launched the business. Since starting the business in February, she said it’s popularity has been increasing, not only with visitors but with locals as well.

She plans to operate Telluride Food Tours in both the winter and summer months and recommends that visitors interested in a food tour set it up early in their stay as the tour will give them a good lay of the land when it comes choosing meals for the rest of the trip. Along with a bottle of water, the tour comes with a pocket size guidebook that contains a map of Telluride and restaurant information, along with a couple of local recipes and money-saving dining coupons.

Telluride Food Tours cost $65 per person and are available four days a week, Wednesday-Saturday, starting at 4:30 p.m.

Visit the Telluride Food Tours website telluridefoodtours.net/ for more information or to set up a reservation.

 

gjarvis@watchnewspapers.com

Twitter: @Gus_Jarvis

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