A TASP Fundraiser, Tells a Story of Motion and Inspiration
Jan 26, 2012 | 1167 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>TOP FORM</b> – Rick Finkelstein carving down Aspen's Snowmass mountain. Paralyzed in a ski accident six years earlier, he was linking turns again on his first run in ‘The Movement,’ a movie screening as a benefit for benefit the Telluride Adaptive Sports Program Monday, Jan. 30, at 7 p.m. at Wilkinson Library. (Photo by Michael Faas)
TOP FORM – Rick Finkelstein carving down Aspen's Snowmass mountain. Paralyzed in a ski accident six years earlier, he was linking turns again on his first run in ‘The Movement,’ a movie screening as a benefit for benefit the Telluride Adaptive Sports Program Monday, Jan. 30, at 7 p.m. at Wilkinson Library. (Photo by Michael Faas)
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TELLURIDE – We live in a ski town. We watch ski movies and imagine ourselves as characters in them, plundering favorite stashes, wide smiles across our faces. This is skiing to us; this is part of life here.

There is another side to that coin, and it’s one we don’t often thing of. The worst-case scenario side. The “what if” side. We bury it beneath the deadfall of Lift 9. 

The Movement, a ski film produced by Kurt Miller, looks at what happens after a ski accident paralyzes a lifelong skier, chronicling his struggles to get back to the hill that nearly killed him. We come to know more characters: A soldier maimed by a landmine, a woman born three months premature whose parents were told she’d never see and never walk. We come to know a man who was a promising racer paralyzed after a regular tumble.

“This is the story of movement. It’s about finding that turning point when physical disability is no longer limitation but a part of character,” says narrator Robert Redford. “Never” is a theme here among the athletes. They were “never” supposed walk or live, let alone make a powder turn. “Our heroes refuse to accept that word,” Redford says.

Warren Miller makes appearances, lending his broken-in-chair approach to ski films. “Movements are more than just good ideas. A movement needs people. It’s an uprising. A rebelling against the status quo … it must mean something, and it must be worth fighting for,” he says.

The movie is screening as part of the Telluride Adaptive Sports Program’s Expand Your Horizons week. The Movement will screen at 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 30 in the Wilkinson Public Library’s Program Room. The cost is $10.

The story is at once inspiring and heartbreaking, demanding a hard look at how we view those with disabilities. Because at the end of the day here, we’re all skiers. We just make our way down the hill differently.

Rick, a Hollywood executive learning to ski again, sums it up like this: “Freedom, movement and balance and weight control …” he says. “It’s just the best.” And here’s Warren Miller’s take on mono-skis: “One advantage of the mono ski is that it’s impossible to cross your tips, so you have to find new ways to crash.”

Traci, who was born three months premature, wasn’t supposed to be able to walk. One day as a kid, she walked on her hands down the hall at the doctor’s office. She’s older now, and has been featured in Warren Miller films before. She’s one of his favorite skiers.

“I never saw myself as someone who couldn’t do things … I think I had a reason for being handicapped,” she said. It was to show people more was possible. “If you get up and try, maybe you can do it.”

There will be a raffle for a TASP pullover for ticketholders. TASP thanks its sponsors, the Telluride Ski and Golf Co., and Telluride Sports.

The Movement, screens Monday, Jan. 30, at 7 p.m., in the Wilkinson Library program room, as part of the Telluride Adaptive Sports Program’s Expand Your Horizons week (suggested donation, $10). The story is at once inspiring and heartbreaking, demanding a hard look at how we view those with disabilities. Because at the end of the day here, we’re all skiers. We just make our way down the hill differently.

By Matthew Beaudin, Telluride Adaptive Sports Program

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