Despite Monsoonal Moisture, Telluride’s Water Restrictions Remain in Place
by Gus Jarvis
Jul 12, 2012 | 1564 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
IT’S RAINING IT’S POURING – Zander Sante watches as Morgan Johnson tested out his Wellies in a Town Park mud puddle on Sunday afternoon at the KOTO Doo Dah. Several days of monsoon rains have transformed the brown dry alpine landscape into a lush green. Despite the monsoonal moisture, water restrictions in Telluride are still in effect. (Photo by Brett Schreckengost)
IT’S RAINING IT’S POURING – Zander Sante watches as Morgan Johnson tested out his Wellies in a Town Park mud puddle on Sunday afternoon at the KOTO Doo Dah. Several days of monsoon rains have transformed the brown dry alpine landscape into a lush green. Despite the monsoonal moisture, water restrictions in Telluride are still in effect. (Photo by Brett Schreckengost)
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Some Restrictions Amended to Lessen Impact on Businesses



TELLURIDE
– While recent monsoon moisture in Telluride has slightly improved drought conditions, Telluride Town Manager Greg Clifton said on Tuesday that water restrictions in Telluride will remain in place, but with new amendments that will lessen the financial impact on Telluride’s commercial businesses.

According to Clifton’s Administrative Order of June 12, the following restrictions remain in place:

• Persons are urged to conserve water in every possible way in their homes and businesses.

• Washing of public or private sidewalks, driveways, parking areas, tennis courts, patios or other hard surfaces with municipal treated water is prohibited (the town may continue to use non-treated well water for such purposes as needed).

• Power washing of structures with municipal treated water is prohibited.

• Filling, refilling or replacement of water in swimming pools, hot tubs or landscape water features with municipal treated water is prohibited (however addition of water to public or private pools, hot tubs or water features to make up for evaporative losses and required maintenance, backwashes, etc., is permitted).

• Installation of new public or private landscaping is prohibited (in the event that such landscaping is required as a condition of development approval, the condition is tolled) except the planting of vegetation that is watered through a drip system.

• Service of water to restaurant patrons is prohibited unless requested.

• Noncommercial washing of privately owned cars, other motor vehicles, trailers, or boats with municipal treated water is prohibited, unless by bucket.

• Use of municipal treated water for commercial car washes is prohibited.

• Use of municipal treated water for irrigation of any public or private lawns, gardens, trees, shrubs, plants, municipal or school fields, or similar grass areas is prohibited except for a period not to exceed thirty minutes, only between 9 p.m. to 9 a.m., and on the following days: Monday, Wednesday, Friday for residents and businesses with odd-numbered addresses; Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday for residents and businesses with even-numbered addresses; Sundays for all residents and businesses. (Drip systems are exempt from the above restrictions.)

On Tuesday, Clifton made amendments to the town’s water restrictions, he said, to lessen the financial impact upon commercial businesses. Those amendments, which are effective immediately, include:

• Allowing for commercial power washing of structures when necessary for exterior painting and related repairs.

• Allowing for commercial installation of new landscaping if such new landscaping can be effectively watered within the date and time of restrictions now in place. No additional watering will be allowed beyond these time restrictions, however. Note that all plantings which are hand watered or watered through a drip system are exempt from the restrictions.

• Allowing for commercial car washing which is programmed or operated to minimize water consumption (approximately 23 gallons per wash).

Clifton said all other restrictions remain in effect.

“We are watching our water flows daily, and the town is doing OK,” Clifton stated in a release to The Watch. “If the monsoonal patterns continue, we will revisit the restrictions, but for now they remain in place with the amendments noted…We wanted to help out the commercial businesses who are most impacted by this.”

Clifton went on to state that since the water restrictions have been in place for nearly a month, they have been very effective. Telluride’s water treatment capacity remains at or below 50 percent and while stream flows remain quite low, they appear to be stabilizing.

 “We are not out of the woods on this matter by any stretch, but there may be cause to make some adjustments,” he stated.

 

gjarvis@watchnewspapers.com or @gusgusj

 

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