Introducing The Werner Herzog Theater
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Werner Herzog Theater
Werner Herzog Theater
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The Telluride Film Festival has named theaters that reflect the pure joy of cinema (Chuck Jones’ Cinema), its early visionaries (the Abel Gance Outdoor Cinema) and the festival’s internationalist flavor (The Pierre, named for French legend Pierre Rissient). Its brand new theater honors the vision and commitment of German director Werner Herzog, who first came to Telluride for a tribute in 1975 and has attended nearly every year since. The 650-seat, state-of-the-art theater, created in conjunction with the Town of Telluride, will be officially dedicated with a screening of Herzog’s Aguirre: Wrath of God.

LETTER FROM ROGER EBERT

September, 2011

Dear Werner,

You often say this modern world is starving for images. That the media pound the same paltry ideas into our heads time and again, and that we need to see around the edges or over the top. When you open Encounters at the End of the World by following a marine biologist under the ice floes of the South Pole, and listening to the alien sounds of the creatures who thrive there, you show me a place on my planet I did not know about, and I am richer. You are the most curious of men. You are like the storytellers of old, returning from far lands with spellbinding tales.

I remember at the Telluride Film Festival, ten or 12 years ago, when you told me you had a video of your latest documentary. We found a TV set in a hotel room, and I saw Bells from the Deep, a film in which you wandered through Russia observing strange beliefs.

There were the people who lived near a deep lake and believed that on its bottom there was a city populated by angels. To see it, they had to wait until winter when the water was crystal clear and then creep spread-eagled onto the ice. If the ice was too thick, they could not see well enough. Too thin, and they might drown. We heard the ice creaking beneath them as they peered for their vision.

Then we met a monk who looked like Rasputin. You found that there were hundreds of “Rasputins,” some claiming to be Jesus Christ, walking through Russia with their prophecies and warnings. We talked for some time about the film, and then you said, “But you know, Roger, it is all made up.” I did not understand. “It is not real. I invented it.”

I didn’t know whether to believe you about your own film. But I know you speak of “ecstatic truth,” of a truth beyond the merely factual, a truth that records not the real world but the world as we dream it.

Your documentary Little Dieter Needs to Fly begins with Dieter Dengler, who really was a prisoner of the Viet Cong, and who really did escape through the jungle and was the only American who freed himself from a Viet Cong prison camp. We see him entering his house, and compulsively opening and closing windows and doors, to be sure he is not locked in. “That was my idea,” you told me. “Dieter does not really do that. But it is how he feels.”

The line between truth and fiction is a mirage in your work.

Some of the documentaries contain fiction, and some of the fiction films contain fact. Yes, you really did haul a boat up a mountainside in Fitzcarraldo, even though any other director would have used a model, or special effects. You organized the ropes and pulleys and workers in the middle of the Amazonian rain forest and hauled the boat up into the jungle. When the boat seemed to be caught in a rapids that threatened its destruction, it really was. The audience will know if the shots are real, you said, and that will affect how they see the film.

I understand this. What must be true, must be true. What must not be true, can be made more true by invention. Your films contain a rapturous truth that transcends the factually mundane. And yet when you find something real, you show it.

I have started out to praise your work and have ended by describing it. Maybe it is the same thing. You and your work are unique and invaluable, and you ennoble the cinema when so many debase it. You have the audacity to believe that if you make a film about anything that interests you, it will interest us as well. And you have proven it.

With admiration,

Roger Ebert
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