Dayspring Farm’s Eggs Come to Montrose
by Watch Staff
Sep 29, 2011 | 772 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>OLATHE ‘GOOD’ EGGS STAY LOCAL</b> – Olathe’s Dayspring Farm (above) uses free-range chickens to produce healthy eggs, which are now being sold in Montrose. (Courtesy photo)
OLATHE ‘GOOD’ EGGS STAY LOCAL – Olathe’s Dayspring Farm (above) uses free-range chickens to produce healthy eggs, which are now being sold in Montrose. (Courtesy photo)
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OLATHE – Dayspring Farm’s free-range eggs are now available in Montrose thanks to assistance from the Montrose-based Valley Food Partnership.

“Dayspring Farm is committed to building a sustainable farm and to growing the future naturally,” says fourth-generation family farmer/rancher Bob Lane of Dayspring.

An antibiotic- and hormone-free operation, Dayspring also raises beef and pork.

“We source GMO-free feed and seed for our animals and seek to be the best stewards of the land we can be by using regenerative pasture practices for all of our livestock and poultry,” says Lane’s business partner and wife, Roxi Lane.

Dayspring’s Rhode Island Reds are raised on clean country pasture, without hormones, antibiotics, or GMO feed. Being free to roam on pasture makes the eggs more nutritious, according to research at Utah State University and the Food Products Lab in Oregon. Free-range chicken eggs have been found to contain up to twice as much vitamin E, to be two-to-four times richer in beta carotene and four times richer in Omega-3 fatty acids than eggs from chickens in confinement production systems.

“By keeping local foods in the Valley, we support our local farmers and our local economy,” says Carol Parker of the Valley Food Partnership, which helped arrange for the sale of Dayspring eggs at Natural Grocers, in Montrose. “With most food traveling an average of 1,500 miles, keeping local foods local not only lowers the carbon footprint – it provides a healthier, fresher product to the consumer.”

She adds, “The USDA reports that many foods lose as much as 50 percent of their nutritional quality within three-to-five days, and that most food takes more than 11 days to arrive on plates in the United States.”
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