COMMUNITY BRIEFS | Time is Running Out to Nominate an Azadi Angel
by Watch Staff
Dec 18, 2013 | 1609 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
PATRIOT FLAG – A quilt titled "Land Of The Free" was donated to the Welcome Home Montrose Warrior Resource Center last week. The quilt, donated by Jim Scheu, a local Korean War Veteran, was made by his wife Barb (right) who stood with Warrior Resource Center Executive Director Emily Smith (left). The quilt is to the displayed in the resource center. (Courtesy photo)
PATRIOT FLAG – A quilt titled "Land Of The Free" was donated to the Welcome Home Montrose Warrior Resource Center last week. The quilt, donated by Jim Scheu, a local Korean War Veteran, was made by his wife Barb (right) who stood with Warrior Resource Center Executive Director Emily Smith (left). The quilt is to the displayed in the resource center. (Courtesy photo)
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JERKY FOR TROOPS – Jim Kerschner, of KUBC radio and volunteer with Operation Sweet Tooth, loaded boxes of donated beefy jerky at the Welcome Home Montrose Warrior Resource Center last Friday. In all, 800 packages of "Ray's Good Stuff," a local jerky maker, were donated with an estimated value of $6,500. Kerschner said the jerky was going to mailed out to 44 military units around the world as part of Operation Sweet Tooth. He said the jerky would make a holiday gift for troops serving overseas. For more information about the nonprofit Warrior Resource Center or to donate visit welcomehomemontrose.org. (Photo by William Woody)
JERKY FOR TROOPS – Jim Kerschner, of KUBC radio and volunteer with Operation Sweet Tooth, loaded boxes of donated beefy jerky at the Welcome Home Montrose Warrior Resource Center last Friday. In all, 800 packages of "Ray's Good Stuff," a local jerky maker, were donated with an estimated value of $6,500. Kerschner said the jerky was going to mailed out to 44 military units around the world as part of Operation Sweet Tooth. He said the jerky would make a holiday gift for troops serving overseas. For more information about the nonprofit Warrior Resource Center or to donate visit welcomehomemontrose.org. (Photo by William Woody)
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HELPING HANDS – Residents and friends of Anciano Towers in Montrose presented 50 handmade “bunnies” to the families served by Partners Mentoring of Delta, Montrose and Ouray counties. This project is part of the Retirement Housing Foundation’s Project “H.A.N.D.S.” (Helping Angels Nationals Donated Support). The organization’s mission is to allow residents to create special items to be given to individuals in need. (Courtesy photo)
HELPING HANDS – Residents and friends of Anciano Towers in Montrose presented 50 handmade “bunnies” to the families served by Partners Mentoring of Delta, Montrose and Ouray counties. This project is part of the Retirement Housing Foundation’s Project “H.A.N.D.S.” (Helping Angels Nationals Donated Support). The organization’s mission is to allow residents to create special items to be given to individuals in need. (Courtesy photo)
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GRANT PRESENTATION – San Miguel Power Association’s  Board President awarded a $2,000 economic development grant to the Telluride Tourism Board last week in Telluride’s Elks Park. The donation was made possible through a CoBank matching grant program that SMPA participated in. CoBank awarded SMPA $5,000 and we matched those monies and set up a $10,000 donor advised fund with the Telluride Foundation. Pictured,from left to right, are Kiera Skinner, Michael Martelon, SMPA Board President  Rube Felicelli, Emily Coleman and Lisa Eidsmo. The SMPA Board felt that supporting our local chamber organizations was one of the best ways to provide support to many local businesses and help our communities. (Courtesy photo)
GRANT PRESENTATION – San Miguel Power Association’s Board President awarded a $2,000 economic development grant to the Telluride Tourism Board last week in Telluride’s Elks Park. The donation was made possible through a CoBank matching grant program that SMPA participated in. CoBank awarded SMPA $5,000 and we matched those monies and set up a $10,000 donor advised fund with the Telluride Foundation. Pictured,from left to right, are Kiera Skinner, Michael Martelon, SMPA Board President Rube Felicelli, Emily Coleman and Lisa Eidsmo. The SMPA Board felt that supporting our local chamber organizations was one of the best ways to provide support to many local businesses and help our communities. (Courtesy photo)
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TELLURIDE – Nominations must be in by Friday, Dec. 20 for the Annual Azadi Angels Awards.

The program, created by Azadi ‘s David Neishabori, recognizes three community “angels,” honoring them with $1,000 donated in their name to the charity of their choice at an awards reception in January.

“In the season of giving, we want to acknowledge these unsung angels.” says Neishabori.  “We all benefit because of their devotion to the community around them. We want to honor and give back to those who have given so much.”

Azadi is looking for unsung heroes, who can be anyone, from a teacher to a volunteer, boardmember or mentor. The one criterion is that it is someone who gives back to the community.

Last year’s winners were Jim Looney, Ben Kerr and Hawkeye Johnson. To nominate an angel, fill out the one page application and write a no longer than one-page letter about why your nominee should be recognized as an Angel.   All nominations must be postmarked by Dec. 20.  For more information, visit Azadiangels.com.  Applications can also be picked up or dropped off at Azadi Fine Rug’s Telluride location at 217 W. Colorado Ave. Azadi has stores in Scottsdale and Sedona, Ariz.

Holiday Open House at Montrose Manor B&B

MONTROSE – Voices of the Wild Foundation, Inc. hosts a holiday open house and fundraiser on Dec. 19 at the Montrose Manor Bed & Breakfast from 4-8 p.m.

Montrose Manor has been fully decorated splendor for the holiday season. Bring your family and friends to help support animal welfare while touring this spectacular home, listening to holiday music and enjoying special treats.

To attend, a donation of $1 for children 5 and under, $10 for children ages 6-16 and $25 for anyone 17 and above is requested. Montrose Manor Bed & Breakfast is located at 60169 LaSalle Rd.. Reservations are not required. For questions call 970/240-6960.

Voices of the Wild Foundation, Inc. is a nonprofit charitable organization that provides a sanctuary where domestic and exotic animals who have been mistreated, abandoned and/or voluntarily surrendered can regain and maintain their physical and mental health and live out their lives in peace and with dignity. Voices of the Wild Foundation is in the process of completing the relocation of its animals from Page, Ariz. to Montrose. The foundation’s website is banjoko.org.

Ouray Public Library Offers January Programs to Kick Off the New Year

OURAY — The Ouray Public Library is offering several programs this January to help its patrons kick off the new year.

To ensure that library patrons can start the year with a clean slate, the annual Food for Fines Amnesty Program will be held from Jan. 2 to 31. Patrons with any overdue books, audio books, and movies (no matter how old) who return their items and make a food donation will have all fines waived. Canned food and dried goods will be collected for the Ridgway Community Food Pantry in lieu of fines.

To keep patrons reading through the winter months, the library is launching a Winter Reading Program, which will run from Jan. 2 to March 31. To participate in the program, patrons will keep track of the books they read throughout the winter. For every book that readers complete, they will enter their name along with the title of the book into a drawing. Every two weeks, a name will be selected and the patron will be receive a free book. Additional prizes will be awarded at the end of the program for the patrons who read the most books.

And to help library patrons stay healthy, the Tri-County Health Network will be returning to the Ouray Library on Thursday, Jan. 30, to provide free and confidential health screenings of cholesterol, blood glucose, blood pressure, and health and weight. Appointments will be scheduled between 10:15 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. and last approximately 30 minutes.

To schedule your health screening or to find out whether you have any overdue fines, please call 970/325-4616. The Ouray Public Library is located at 320 6th Avenue and is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Montrose Area Committee Accepting Wildlife Project Ideas

WESTERN SAN JUANS – In its ongoing effort to reduce conflicts between wildlife and agricultural producers, the Uncompahgre Habitat Partnership Committee is currently accepting applications for projects from landowners.

The Habitat Partnership Program’s mission is to reduce wildlife conflicts associated with forage and fencing and to assist Colorado Parks and Wildlife in meeting big- game management goals. Landowners and agricultural producers eligible for this program must live in Delta, Montrose, Ouray, San Miguel, Delta or Ouray counties.

Projects should focus on long-term solutions aimed at reducing conflict between livestock and wildlife. The general project categories include: habitat improvement, and fence improvement or repair. The committee provides cost-sharing funds for projects.

Projects within residential subdivisions are not considered for funding.

To determine if a project is viable, contact the Colorado Parks and Wildlife office in Montrose at 970/252-6000. If the project is eligible, an application to submit will be issued. Colorado Parks and Wildlife works with Habitat Partnership Committees throughout the state. For more information about the programs, see: cpw.state.co.us and selected the "Land & Water" tab.

MMH 2014 Wellness Calendar Available

MONTROSE – Montrose Memorial Hospital has published a 2014 Wellness Calendar for the community.  

The bright, informative calendar has monthly wellness tips and information on services available at Montrose Memorial Hospital.  The free calendars are available at the front Information Desk at MMH, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-4p.m. until they are gone.

Ice Safety Tips From Colorado Parks and Wildlife

WESTERN SAN JUANS – Colorado’s early winter blast has brought freezing temperatures and ice to the state.  But despite the chill, Colorado Parks and Wildlife is reminding people that lakes, ponds and streams still may not be ready for winter activity. Here are a few basic safety rules to follow when enjoying winter adventures on the ice.

Always assume that unsafe ice conditions may exist and remember ice thickness will vary from place to place and day to day. Four inches of ice is generally considered safe for ice fishing and ice-skating. However, OHVs need at least five inches of ice thickness. Whenever there is any question about thickness or conditions the best advice is to stay off the ice.

Look for signs of unsafe conditions, including ice of different colors, water on top of the ice, cracks, pressure ridges, open water and bubbles in the ice. Also, beware of ice covered with snow. Sometimes the snow serves as insulation, keeping the ice from melting. Other times, the snow has the opposite effect, insulating the surface from freezing. Also be aware that water levels can fluctuate in reservoirs which can affect ice stability.

If you do choose to venture onto the ice, remember the following ice safety tips:

• Never go onto the ice alone. Having someone with you means your partner can call or send for help if you fall in.

• Remember: Reach-Throw-Go. If you are with someone who falls through the ice use this approach. If you can’t reach the person from shore, throw them a floatation device or rope. If you still can’t help the person quickly – go for help. Never attempt to walk out onto the ice to rescue your friend because you might also fall through the ice.

• Avoid alcoholic beverages. Alcohol increases your chance for hypothermia, which is the loss of body temperature. It can also lower inhibitions, increasing the likelihood that you might take risks you otherwise wouldn’t take.

• Always wear a lifejacket. Wear a lifejacket or personal flotation device (PFD) over winter clothing. Lifejackets can provide excellent flotation and protection from hypothermia.

• Assemble a personal safety kit. Always wear a safety kit on your body when going out onto the ice. Safety kits should include an ice pick, rope and a whistle to call for help.

• Always keep your pets on a leash. Never allow your dog to run out onto the ice and never walk your dog near a frozen lake or pond without a leash. If your dog falls through the ice, do not attempt a rescue. Go for help.  If the ice couldn’t support the weight of your animal, it can’t support you.

Even with the best planning and preparation, accidents can happen. If you do fall through the ice, remember the following:

• Don’t panic. Try to remain calm to conserve as much energy as possible. Try to get your arms onto the ice and kick as hard as you can with your feet to help lift you onto the ice, and then roll to safety. If you can’t get out of the cold water by yourself, take the following appropriate actions to extend your survival time while waiting to be rescued.

• Do not swim. Swimming will cause your body to lose heat much faster than if you stay as still as possible.

• Act slowly and deliberately to conserve heat. Expect a progressive decrease in your strength and ability to move. Make the harder maneuvers at the beginning, while you can.

• Keep your upper body above water. Keep your head and upper body as far out of the water as reasonably possible to conserve heat.

There’s lots of outdoor fun to enjoy in Colorado but please do so carefully. No one can guarantee you that the ice is safe. The decision to go onto the ice is personal and should be made only after taking all the precautions to reduce the risk.

Mountain Village Area Experienced Power Outage on Dec. 15

MOUNTAIN VILLAGE – Approximately 1,200 San Miguel Power Association, Inc., members in the Mountain Village area experienced a power outage on Sunday, Dec. 15, beginning at 4:33 p.m. SMPA crews located the failed equipment and were able to restore power to half of the affected members by 5:30 p.m. Power was restored to the remaining members at 7:41 p.m. Repair was delayed due to access issues because of snow and ice.

SMPA would like to thank its members for their patience and support of the lineman responding to the outage. In an effort to keep their members informed, the co-op coordinates with their 24-hour dispatch service to provide outage updates on SMPA’s Facebook page facebook.com/SanMiguelPower. During non-business hours the co-op recommends checking the page for the most up to date information. However, SMPA reminds members to never report outages on Facebook, as the page is not monitored continuously.

To report an outage, call your local office at 970/ 626-5549 or 970/ 864-7311. If it is after hours you will be directed to the 24-hour dispatch service.

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